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Tips To Write An Impressive Resume

Writing a resume is often the most arduous activity of the entire job application process and one which requires painstaking attention to detail. EnglishMate, English speaking institutes from Hindustan Times, lists a few points that one should consider while writing their resume.

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How long should a resume be?

Most recent graduates should confine their resumes to one page. If your resume goes to a second page, make sure your margins are not too wide (no more than 1” left and right and as little as ½” top and bottom). If the headings are on the left, stack the words (e.g. “TEACHING” with “EXPERIENCE” under it, rather than next to it).

What should one include?

  • Name: Start with your NAME (we suggest upper case bold for name only), and complete contact information (address, phone and email address).
  • Certifications: List professional certifications and licenses with dates received. (Chronological Order)
  • Education: Summarize your education in reverse order, starting with your last degree or the one you are working on now. Include school name, city, state, degree, major, date degree was – or will be – conferred and honors.
  • Courses: To tailor your resume to a specific job, you may include a list of “relevant courses.”
  • Honors/Awards/Activities: Use one or more categories as appropriate, highlighting achievements such as scholarships, Dean’s List, leadership roles in clubs, campus/community organizations, sports or other accomplishments.
  • Research: If applicable, you may include special projects or research, highlighting significant relevant classroom learning experiences such as research projects, independent study, special presentations, and major papers.
  • Experience: Your experience, regardless of how you acquired it (full time or part time jobs, internships, and community or college service) is usually of chief interest to the reader. For each position, include: Job Title (followed by dates of employment), Employer, City, and State. Emphasize (put first) either employers or job titles, but be consistent! Describe responsibilities, duties and accomplishments, preferably using list format with bullets.
  • Skills: Of great interest to employers! Indicate computer hardware and software knowledge, fluency in foreign languages, or other technical skills. If you have several of each, use separate categories.
  • Interests: List interests only if you are really knowledgeable about something or very good at it.

How do you make your resume look professional?

  • Include no personal information: age, health, marital status, height, weight, religion.
  • Never use the first person “I.” Do not use full sentences. Eliminate all unnecessary words (a, the).
  • Never lie or exaggerate.
  • Add to the eye appeal of your resume by varying the typeface for emphasis: bold, underline, italic, UPPER CASE, etc. (Use italics for emphasis only – perhaps your job title – never for the entire resume.) Use an attractive legible typeface such as Times or Arial, not an old-fashioned font such as Courier.
  • Use “bullets” (•, ♦, *, −) for listing items under a heading description, such as experience.
  • Proofread carefully. Grammatical, content and typographical errors may eliminate you immediately from consideration for an interview. Ask others to proofread the resume as well.

What is the most important feature of a successful resume?

Here are some pointers:

  • Use action verbs to describe your duties and accomplishments, depicting yourself as someone who gets the job done: one who “created . . . published . . . solved” – not one who merely “participated in” or was “responsible for.” Avoid using “assisted” – say what you did. Vary the vocabulary. For present jobs, use present tense verbs and for past jobs, use past tense.
  • Emphasize skills and experience related to the job you want and to the employer’s needs.
  • When describing your experience, use detailed descriptions that give the reader a picture of you as an individual (“Adapted lesson on dinosaurs to learning styles of autistic children”) rather than vague descriptions that make you sound like everyone else (“Followed the curriculum of cooperating teacher”).
  • Quantify accomplishments by citing numbers, percentages, etc., where appropriate.
  • Put the most related and impressive accomplishment first within each job description.

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Interview

Acing Job Interviews

1. Start with knowing who you are and what you want. The easiest of all job interview questions — “tell me about yourself.” By articulating a concise response to this question, you’ll be — and more importantly appear — more confident.

 

2. Gather work samples. The time and effort of reviewing your work samples and accomplishments lays an excellent foundation for composing responses to typical interview questions.

 

3. Develop stories that demonstrate excellence. No matter the type of interview you might face, with a collection of stories that demonstrate your passion, expertise, and accomplishments, you’ll be ready.

 

4. Ask what to expect when you’re invited for the interview. Information is a key to your success, and knowing the type of interview to expect — and who will be conducting the interview — is crucial to your success.

 

5. Use your network to learn more about employer, open position. See if any of your network contacts — works for your prospective employer.

 

6. Conduct interview prep and practice. Write out responses to typical interview questions, making certain to provide enough detail to properly answer the questions.

 

7. Take your interviewing skills for a tryout. If this interview is your first in a while or just a really big one for you — take your interview prep to the next level by working with a friend or career expert and conducting a mock interview.

 

8. Dress for success. Appearance does matter. Your goal is to look the part of someone who already works at the employer’s workplace.

 

7. Bring extra copies of your resume to the interview. You never know when the hiring manager might misplace your resume. Taking along a few extra copies of your resume is a simple, but smart idea.

 

8. Plan to arrive a bit early to interview. Arriving 10-15 minutes before your interview — avoid being any earlier.

 

9. Greet everyone you meet with respect — and a smile. When you’re interviewing, everyone you speak with matters — from the receptionist to the assistant to the hiring manger… everyone.

 

10. Shine from the very beginning of the interview. Making a great first impression begins with a firm handshake, smile, and eye contact. It’s important to show your enthusiasm and confidence in the interview.

 

11. Excel in the job interview. This is the moment when all your preparation pays off. Using positive non-verbal (good posture, eye contact, smile, strong speaking voice) and solid responses should help propel you through the interview successfully. Remember to stay calm — even if thrown by an unexpected question.

 

12. Close the interview strongly. Always close the interview with a thank-you and a request for information about the next step in the process.

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