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Writing Cohesive And Coherent Essays

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“The pen is mightier than the sword,”

This axiom by Shakespeare holds the verity and relevance when compared to a sword. On the contrary, delving deep into the nuances of writing; the pen itself is not enough to make an effective writer. Although most of us may envision ourselves as the budding writers (no less than Shakespeare) but brainwave alone is not the key to effective essay writing.

The generic formula for effective essay writing is shared below:

The Five Paragraph Essay

Paragraph 1: Introduction
Paragraph 2: Body 1
Paragraph 3: Body 2
Paragraph 4: Body 3
Paragraph 5: Conclusion

The Introduction

The principle purpose of the introduction is to present your “thesis” on the topic. The essay should begin with a “hook” that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to read on. Hence we start with a general idea about the topic and subsequently arrive to the main idea. The thesis should be a clear, one-sentence explanation of your position in an unambiguous manner .Following the thesis, a mini-outline is proffered which previews the examples you will use to support your thesis in the rest of the essay. Finally, designing the last sentence in this way has the added benefit of seamlessly moving the reader to the first paragraph of the body of the paper.

The Body Paragraphs

The middle paragraphs of the essay are collectively known as the body paragraphs supporting the main purpose of spelling out in detail the examples that support the thesis.

For body paragraph 1: The strongest argument or most significant example ought to be used at this juncture. The first sentence of this paragraph should be the topic sentence of the paragraph that directly relates to the examples listed in the mini-outline of introductory paragraph. Seal the deal by directly stating why this example is relevant. The topic sentence should be ornate with a transitional word and have a common thread to bind the other body paragraphs.

The Conclusion

As the final paragraph represents your last chance to make your case and, as such, should follow an extremely rigid format. One way to think of the conclusion is, paradoxically, as a second introduction because it does in fact contain many of the same features. Effective conclusions open with a concluding transition (“in conclusion,” “in the end,” etc.) and an allusion to the “hook” used in the introductory paragraph.

Introduction Paragraph

  • Attention grabbing hook
  • A thesis statement
  • A preview of the three subtopics you will discuss in the subsequent body paragraph.

Body Paragraph 1

  • Topic sentence with the subtopic coupled with a transition word
  • Supporting details with relevant examples
  • An explanation how the example supports the thesis.

Body Paragraph 2

  • Topic sentence with the subtopic coupled with a transition word
  • Supporting details with relevant examples
  • An explanation how the example supports the thesis.

Body Paragraph 3

  • Topic sentence with the subtopic coupled with a transition word
  • Supporting details with relevant examples
  • An explanation how the example supports the thesis.

Conclusion

  • Concluding transition, reverse hook and reinstatement of thesis
  • Global Statement or call to action

Tips to make your essays shine

  1. Plan and make a framework of your essay
  2. Include variety of expressions (ideas)
  3. Use transition words
  4. Use varied lexical range
  5. Engage in the art of paraphrasing
  6. Give your thoughts a structured approach
  7. Practice makes a man perfect

Hope these tips and techniques are useful and that they help you take your essay-writing to new heights.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter. 

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Effective Presentation Skills

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The opportunity to pitch your services to a potential client, spell out your business plan to a potential business partner, or promote your business at an event may require that you give a presentation. Whether or not your presentation achieves its desired outcome can be affected by your skills as a speaker, so it’s important to step in front of your audience with your best foot forward. The following points explain how to prepare, deliver, and answer questions about a killer presentation.

How to Improve Your Presentation Skills: Preparation

Stay focused & on your toes: No one is impressed by a presentation that rambles. Rambling happens when the speaker is both self-indulgent and unorganized. Your purpose and prose must be specifically directed to interests of your listeners or they will mentally shut you down. Even if you hit upon a topic of interest, you will lose them quickly if they can’t follow the logic of your ideas. Outline the structure of your presentation in a way that people can follow easily. Research your audience to make sure the topic is truly of their interest.

Mind your rate of speech: You’ve got a lot of material to cover, so you talk fast to get through all of it. If you need to talk fast, your presentation is too long. Plus, fast talk makes you sound either nervous or like a stereotypical “fast talking'” salesperson. Rather, cut your presentation down. If you’re talking fast because you’re nervous, write “SLOW DOWN!” on each page of your notes.

Don’t tell cock & bull stories: There must be a reason you are presenting to these people. Most likely you want them to take action of some kind.  Maybe you want them to get involved in an activity, or to make something happen in their own lives. They are not likely to ­take action just because you tell them to do so. You need to connect with them emotionally and inspire them to change their behavior. Stories do more for emotional connection than any other speech technique. Audience is very smart. Tell them compelling stories. The more personal and authentic the stories, the better the response.

Making personal excuses: You downgrade the audience’s expectations by offering an excuse in advance for your poor performance. (E.g., “I’m so tired”; “I got in late last night.”) You’re giving yourself an excuse so you won’t feel so bad if you fail. Plus, nobody wants to hear you to crib & cry about your problems to begin with.  Regardless of how you’re feeling, show enthusiasm for being there and put your best foot forward.

Reading from slides will bore them to death : Your slides reflect your thinking on a subject, so you read your slides aloud to the audience in order to replicate your thought process. Presumably everyone in your audience can read, so it becomes boring if it is re-read. Rather, use slides as visual signposts for the points you’re making rather than a written version or summary of those points.

Use Media Only to Enhance: PowerPoint, visuals and video are powerful presentation tools when used correctly. But they can be disastrous distractions when misused.

Do not ask for extra time: You feel you don’t have sufficient time to communicate your important information, so you request extra time to communicate it. If there’s less time because you’re late, you’re adding injury to insult. If it’s because your presentation is too long, well, your presentation is too long. Rather, adapt your presentation so as to fit the allotted time. If you’re late, end your presentation when it’s scheduled to end.

Videotape yourself – You can’t know how you come off to people until you see it. Recording yourself is the best way to target the areas where you can improve.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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Dress Code in Interviews

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The first ten seconds decide a lot about your success in an interview. Before you utter a single word to the interviewer, you have already made an impression based on how you’re dressed. Although every company has a different dress code, but it’s still important to keep appropriacy in mind.

Your attire along with your body language and confidence plays a vital role in the success of your interview and boosts your chances to bask in the dream job.

What if a woman wears a dark pant suit, pulls her hair into a low ponytail, wears little makeup, no jewellery and flat shoes to a job interview as a clothing stylist? It’s doubtful she would be offered the job. The hiring manager would probably be looking for someone who projects creativity and style in the clothing, wears makeup and accessories that are trendy and fashion forward. On the other hand, what if a woman wears the same suit, pulls a neat ponytail and minimal makeup for the role of an HR manager? Of course, she will be considered more professional and will create the right impact on the hiring manager.

Thus, dress in a manner that is professionally suitable to the position for which you are applying. In most of the cases, this means wearing formals. When in doubt, go basic.

Some Dos and Don’ts

  • You should wear a formal suit to interviews. A matching blazer and pants, dress shirt, tie (you can skip the tie if you are a female), coordinating socks and dress shoes. A dark-colored suit with light colored shirt is your best option.
  • Shoes should match your belt, the belt should be very basic.
  • Females should keep their makeup and jewellery minimal.
  • Avoid bright colours and flashy accessories.
  • Your outfit should not look dirty and make sure your clothes are ironed.
  • Choose simple and dark colors.
  • Shoes should usually be black in colour, and very simple in style and fairly low-heeled for ladies.
  • Shower before the interview. Don’t wear too much perfume or you will smell overpowering and you don’t want that, do you?
  • Dress according to the season, skip the blazer/ jacket if it’s summer time.
  • Make sure your attire is well fitted.
  • Your hair should be neat, clean and styled in a simple manner. Huge clips, brightly-colored scrunchies or elastics, and super high ponytails look out of place with formals. You may want to wear your hair in an updo, pull it back into a low ponytail; men’s hair should be short and neatly combed. The idea is to look polished and professional.
  • Dress appropriate to the position.

“Perception is reality.”  – Lee Atwater

Think about the image you want to project during your interview and then choose the apt outfit. You may not have to dress like this everyday to work, but you are more likely to be taken seriously and you are more likely to present an image of a sincere and a professional hire if you dress appropriately.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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Tips To Crack A Job Interview

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Know Yourself- Skills, Accomplishments, Goals

This is the first step you need to take to prepare for an interview. Just as successful salespeople must know everything about the product they sell, you must know your skills and be able to “sell” them to an interviewer. It is what your skills, accomplishments and goals actually are.

Usually, one of the first questions you will encounter in a job interview is, “Tell me something about yourself.” By making a list of your skills and accomplishments that match the employer’s requirements, you can answer this question with ease and start the interview on the right note. The closer your skills and traits are to the job description, the better chance you have of landing the job.

Preparing for an interview  

Self-Assessment

An important part of knowing yourself is having an accurate assessment of your qualities and skills.

Identifying these before your interview is important, you will want to use some of these traits to “sell” yourself in the interview. Using the scale below, rate your perception of your competence in each quality and skill.

      4              3            2            1          0

Excellent  Good  Average  Weak  Poor

Personal Qualities

  • _____ Enthusiastic/Energetic
  • _____ Resourceful
  • _____ Goal Oriented
  • _____ Competitive
  • _____ Responsible/Reliable
  • _____ Effective Team Member
  • _____ Analytical
  • _____ Creative
  • _____ Ability to teach/train
  • _____ Motivating
  • _____ Effective communication.

NOTE: Think of examples for each rating of 3 or 4. You can use these examples during your interview.

Research the Company – Learn as much as you can beforehand

Just as in learning any skill, successful interviewing requires preparation and practice. This is not the best time to try and “wing it.” A successful interview is very much like a sales encounter. You must demonstrate your interest by finding out everything you can about the company and the position before the actual interview. The kinds of things you should know about the company include:

  • How long has the company been in existence?
  • What services does the company provide or what products does it make?
  • Who are their major competitors?
  • Which is the parent company?
  • What are the company’s assets and earnings?
  • Does the company have any international operations?

Prepare Your Questions­­­­­­

Know the purpose of asking questions

  • Questions demonstrate interest, preparedness, critical thinking, and desire to achieve.
  • Good questions reveal your knowledge about the job, show that you pay attention, and establish a personal connection with the interviewer.
  • Allows you to learn more about the position and the organization. Helps you determine if the position and organization are right for you.
  • Gives you the opportunity to further “sell” your qualifications by gathering specific information from the interviewer. By listening to the interviewer’s responses to your well thought-out questions, you may learn more about the organization’s needs and prepare accordingly.

Practice, Practice, Practice

When preparing for an interview, practice in front of the mirror and work on your voice modulation and clarity in speech or you may even record your voice and do the self-evaluation.

During the Interview

Be Prompt and Prepared

On the day of your interview you should plan to arrive 10 – 15 minutes before your scheduled interview time. Be sure to ask for accurate directions and take into consideration the distance you must travel to reach your destination, you might encounter traffic, parking issues, and even time zone changes if it’s a long trip and remember to carry all the important documents and of course, a copy of your resume.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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Tips To Write An Impressive Resume

Writing a resume is often the most arduous activity of the entire job application process and one which requires painstaking attention to detail. EnglishMate, English speaking institutes from Hindustan Times, lists a few points that one should consider while writing their resume.

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How long should a resume be?

Most recent graduates should confine their resumes to one page. If your resume goes to a second page, make sure your margins are not too wide (no more than 1” left and right and as little as ½” top and bottom). If the headings are on the left, stack the words (e.g. “TEACHING” with “EXPERIENCE” under it, rather than next to it).

What should one include?

  • Name: Start with your NAME (we suggest upper case bold for name only), and complete contact information (address, phone and email address).
  • Certifications: List professional certifications and licenses with dates received. (Chronological Order)
  • Education: Summarize your education in reverse order, starting with your last degree or the one you are working on now. Include school name, city, state, degree, major, date degree was – or will be – conferred and honors.
  • Courses: To tailor your resume to a specific job, you may include a list of “relevant courses.”
  • Honors/Awards/Activities: Use one or more categories as appropriate, highlighting achievements such as scholarships, Dean’s List, leadership roles in clubs, campus/community organizations, sports or other accomplishments.
  • Research: If applicable, you may include special projects or research, highlighting significant relevant classroom learning experiences such as research projects, independent study, special presentations, and major papers.
  • Experience: Your experience, regardless of how you acquired it (full time or part time jobs, internships, and community or college service) is usually of chief interest to the reader. For each position, include: Job Title (followed by dates of employment), Employer, City, and State. Emphasize (put first) either employers or job titles, but be consistent! Describe responsibilities, duties and accomplishments, preferably using list format with bullets.
  • Skills: Of great interest to employers! Indicate computer hardware and software knowledge, fluency in foreign languages, or other technical skills. If you have several of each, use separate categories.
  • Interests: List interests only if you are really knowledgeable about something or very good at it.

How do you make your resume look professional?

  • Include no personal information: age, health, marital status, height, weight, religion.
  • Never use the first person “I.” Do not use full sentences. Eliminate all unnecessary words (a, the).
  • Never lie or exaggerate.
  • Add to the eye appeal of your resume by varying the typeface for emphasis: bold, underline, italic, UPPER CASE, etc. (Use italics for emphasis only – perhaps your job title – never for the entire resume.) Use an attractive legible typeface such as Times or Arial, not an old-fashioned font such as Courier.
  • Use “bullets” (•, ♦, *, −) for listing items under a heading description, such as experience.
  • Proofread carefully. Grammatical, content and typographical errors may eliminate you immediately from consideration for an interview. Ask others to proofread the resume as well.

What is the most important feature of a successful resume?

Here are some pointers:

  • Use action verbs to describe your duties and accomplishments, depicting yourself as someone who gets the job done: one who “created . . . published . . . solved” – not one who merely “participated in” or was “responsible for.” Avoid using “assisted” – say what you did. Vary the vocabulary. For present jobs, use present tense verbs and for past jobs, use past tense.
  • Emphasize skills and experience related to the job you want and to the employer’s needs.
  • When describing your experience, use detailed descriptions that give the reader a picture of you as an individual (“Adapted lesson on dinosaurs to learning styles of autistic children”) rather than vague descriptions that make you sound like everyone else (“Followed the curriculum of cooperating teacher”).
  • Quantify accomplishments by citing numbers, percentages, etc., where appropriate.
  • Put the most related and impressive accomplishment first within each job description.

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