Skip to main content

Writing Cohesive And Coherent Essays

blogpost3(option)

“The pen is mightier than the sword,”

This axiom by Shakespeare holds the verity and relevance when compared to a sword. On the contrary, delving deep into the nuances of writing; the pen itself is not enough to make an effective writer. Although most of us may envision ourselves as the budding writers (no less than Shakespeare) but brainwave alone is not the key to effective essay writing.

The generic formula for effective essay writing is shared below:

The Five Paragraph Essay

Paragraph 1: Introduction
Paragraph 2: Body 1
Paragraph 3: Body 2
Paragraph 4: Body 3
Paragraph 5: Conclusion

The Introduction

The principle purpose of the introduction is to present your “thesis” on the topic. The essay should begin with a “hook” that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to read on. Hence we start with a general idea about the topic and subsequently arrive to the main idea. The thesis should be a clear, one-sentence explanation of your position in an unambiguous manner .Following the thesis, a mini-outline is proffered which previews the examples you will use to support your thesis in the rest of the essay. Finally, designing the last sentence in this way has the added benefit of seamlessly moving the reader to the first paragraph of the body of the paper.

The Body Paragraphs

The middle paragraphs of the essay are collectively known as the body paragraphs supporting the main purpose of spelling out in detail the examples that support the thesis.

For body paragraph 1: The strongest argument or most significant example ought to be used at this juncture. The first sentence of this paragraph should be the topic sentence of the paragraph that directly relates to the examples listed in the mini-outline of introductory paragraph. Seal the deal by directly stating why this example is relevant. The topic sentence should be ornate with a transitional word and have a common thread to bind the other body paragraphs.

The Conclusion

As the final paragraph represents your last chance to make your case and, as such, should follow an extremely rigid format. One way to think of the conclusion is, paradoxically, as a second introduction because it does in fact contain many of the same features. Effective conclusions open with a concluding transition (“in conclusion,” “in the end,” etc.) and an allusion to the “hook” used in the introductory paragraph.

Introduction Paragraph

  • Attention grabbing hook
  • A thesis statement
  • A preview of the three subtopics you will discuss in the subsequent body paragraph.

Body Paragraph 1

  • Topic sentence with the subtopic coupled with a transition word
  • Supporting details with relevant examples
  • An explanation how the example supports the thesis.

Body Paragraph 2

  • Topic sentence with the subtopic coupled with a transition word
  • Supporting details with relevant examples
  • An explanation how the example supports the thesis.

Body Paragraph 3

  • Topic sentence with the subtopic coupled with a transition word
  • Supporting details with relevant examples
  • An explanation how the example supports the thesis.

Conclusion

  • Concluding transition, reverse hook and reinstatement of thesis
  • Global Statement or call to action

Tips to make your essays shine

  1. Plan and make a framework of your essay
  2. Include variety of expressions (ideas)
  3. Use transition words
  4. Use varied lexical range
  5. Engage in the art of paraphrasing
  6. Give your thoughts a structured approach
  7. Practice makes a man perfect

Hope these tips and techniques are useful and that they help you take your essay-writing to new heights.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter. 

Share Your Views

Common Mistakes To Avoid In An Interview

Shalini was interviewed for her dream job last Monday, but she showed up late, wore the wrong attire and as a result she couldn’t put together a sentence or two. She fumbled, looked unprepared and guess what? She couldn’t make it. It happens to the best of us, when we go unprepared. It is not just knowledge and experience, we need to understand the importance of so many things, be it our dress sense, confidence, body language, attitude etc. Understand that, keeping a few things in mind will definitely help you do fairly well in your interviews.

blog_post_wl

Show them you would be a great hire and avoid making these common mistakes:

Negative body language and inappropriate behaviour

If you never smile, have a limp handshake, and don’t make eye contact with the interviewers, you’ll come across as too shy or too strange or simply not interested. Show your interest in the position you are applying for.

So, smile, say hello, look them in the eye, and shake hands as though you really are happy to meet them.

Restrict yourself from being too entertaining or amusing. Inappropriate behaviour leads to its adverse effects.

Appearing uninterested

If there is one vacancy, then there is no dearth of people applying for the same. That means, the employers have enough choice, therefore, if you don’t show interest in being a part of that company they certainly aren’t interested in hiring you.

Ask intelligent questions that indicate that you have done some research, if you don’t seem prepared and diligent; it shows you’re unprepared and lack of preparation is an opportunity crusher.

Preparation will help you demonstrate your interest in them and the job. You will also perform better in the interview when you are prepared.

Sharing inappropriate information

Sometimes, people have a whole-truth-and-nothing-but-the-truth mind-set in a job interview, so they “spill their guts” in answer to every question. Not smart or useful! It’s not recommended that you tell lies, but avoid boring the interviewer and blowing an opportunity by sharing too much information. If they want more details, they’ll ask.

Unprofessional questions

To an employer, no question means lack of interest. During the first interview, asking questions only about raises, promotions, vacation, and benefits are not usually well-received. Those questions apparently indicate that you are just interested in specific personal benefits rather than the job.

Instead, ask for details about the job like, what an average day is like, if the job is new or being filled because the previous employee was promoted, etc.

Not enough research

Do a thorough research on the profile of the company by visiting their website, Research about their missions and aims, locations, if they are a part of a larger organization, their subsidiaries, and work of the subsidiaries.
Note the names of their products and/or services and get familiar with what each does.
Research about the officers named on the website, their location, any common background with any of them. (Hometown, school, previous organization, etc.)

It’s easy to make these mistakes without even realizing, and many of them are more common than you might think! Take the time to prepare, so you don’t have to stress out about blunders after the interview. Good Luck!

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

Share Your Views

Tips To Write An Impressive Resume

Writing a resume is often the most arduous activity of the entire job application process and one which requires painstaking attention to detail. EnglishMate, English speaking institutes from Hindustan Times, lists a few points that one should consider while writing their resume.

Resume wo logo

How long should a resume be?

Most recent graduates should confine their resumes to one page. If your resume goes to a second page, make sure your margins are not too wide (no more than 1” left and right and as little as ½” top and bottom). If the headings are on the left, stack the words (e.g. “TEACHING” with “EXPERIENCE” under it, rather than next to it).

What should one include?

  • Name: Start with your NAME (we suggest upper case bold for name only), and complete contact information (address, phone and email address).
  • Certifications: List professional certifications and licenses with dates received. (Chronological Order)
  • Education: Summarize your education in reverse order, starting with your last degree or the one you are working on now. Include school name, city, state, degree, major, date degree was – or will be – conferred and honors.
  • Courses: To tailor your resume to a specific job, you may include a list of “relevant courses.”
  • Honors/Awards/Activities: Use one or more categories as appropriate, highlighting achievements such as scholarships, Dean’s List, leadership roles in clubs, campus/community organizations, sports or other accomplishments.
  • Research: If applicable, you may include special projects or research, highlighting significant relevant classroom learning experiences such as research projects, independent study, special presentations, and major papers.
  • Experience: Your experience, regardless of how you acquired it (full time or part time jobs, internships, and community or college service) is usually of chief interest to the reader. For each position, include: Job Title (followed by dates of employment), Employer, City, and State. Emphasize (put first) either employers or job titles, but be consistent! Describe responsibilities, duties and accomplishments, preferably using list format with bullets.
  • Skills: Of great interest to employers! Indicate computer hardware and software knowledge, fluency in foreign languages, or other technical skills. If you have several of each, use separate categories.
  • Interests: List interests only if you are really knowledgeable about something or very good at it.

How do you make your resume look professional?

  • Include no personal information: age, health, marital status, height, weight, religion.
  • Never use the first person “I.” Do not use full sentences. Eliminate all unnecessary words (a, the).
  • Never lie or exaggerate.
  • Add to the eye appeal of your resume by varying the typeface for emphasis: bold, underline, italic, UPPER CASE, etc. (Use italics for emphasis only – perhaps your job title – never for the entire resume.) Use an attractive legible typeface such as Times or Arial, not an old-fashioned font such as Courier.
  • Use “bullets” (•, ♦, *, −) for listing items under a heading description, such as experience.
  • Proofread carefully. Grammatical, content and typographical errors may eliminate you immediately from consideration for an interview. Ask others to proofread the resume as well.

What is the most important feature of a successful resume?

Here are some pointers:

  • Use action verbs to describe your duties and accomplishments, depicting yourself as someone who gets the job done: one who “created . . . published . . . solved” – not one who merely “participated in” or was “responsible for.” Avoid using “assisted” – say what you did. Vary the vocabulary. For present jobs, use present tense verbs and for past jobs, use past tense.
  • Emphasize skills and experience related to the job you want and to the employer’s needs.
  • When describing your experience, use detailed descriptions that give the reader a picture of you as an individual (“Adapted lesson on dinosaurs to learning styles of autistic children”) rather than vague descriptions that make you sound like everyone else (“Followed the curriculum of cooperating teacher”).
  • Quantify accomplishments by citing numbers, percentages, etc., where appropriate.
  • Put the most related and impressive accomplishment first within each job description.

For more information, please follow us!

Share Your Views

Six Golden Rules To Ace A Group Discussion

GD wo logo

As each sport and game has its own rules and tips to help you navigate it successfully, the same goes for group discussions too. The general tip is that you follow the rules, gauge your opponents’ strengths and weaknesses, work around their strengths, tap into their weaknesses and you can sail through with the perfect image in group discussions.

Rule 1: Prepare

Work begins long before you sit for the group discussion. Your performance is as good as your preparation. Half the preparation is about knowledge. If you think you can wing it with aggression, you are mistaken. Find out the kind of topics that are given at the institution or company you are applying for.

Prepare well in time on as many topics as you can, not just the ones given in the past, but related ones too. You never know when the subject would be changed. Get into the habit of active reading. It’s different from passive reading. Passive reading is where you read merely to understand the subject. Active reading is where you not only understand the subject, but also begin to raise questions and voice your opinion – positive, negative or neutral about the subject. This is critical in the group discussion to counter or support others’ points of view.

The next part of rule 1 is to have mock GDs, preferably with differing groups of friends. The point is to train your mind to think of any given topic’s pros and cons in a dynamic situation where you can’t predict the person’s response. More importantly, it is about looking at all the possible angles to the topic. This shows your logical mind, creativity and also your ability to think on your feet which comes with preparation.

Rule 2: Know the Participants

Carry a notepad and pen to note down your discussion points as soon as the topic is given. Most people who attend GDs are as focused on their performance as they tend to be. Take a deep breath and when the team introduces itself, note down the participants’ names. In the heat of the discussion, calling out the person’s name is a good way to get his attention. All of us respond instinctively when our name is called out, so use this technique. Not only does it get you their attention, it also shows your people skills and presence of mind.

Rule 3: Take Care of your Posture

Your body posture reveals your state of mind. At the same time, it conditions you to a particular way of thinking. Don’t lean back or lean forward. Find the balance.

Let your body posture be of polite intensity so that you come across as a balanced individual with plenty of energy. This also shows empathy and respect to others when they speak and is an asset that brings you additional points.

Rule 4: Take Charge

Take charge of the discussion right in the beginning. It shows your leadership capability. Introduce the topic by setting the framework for the ensuing discussion and state your opening point before leaving it to the group. Further, when it comes to conclusions, many GDs fall through and participants don’t make good use of it although it brings points. Conclude the discussion by summing up if you can. To do this, listen actively throughout the discussion and note down the key highlights – say, in columns of negative and positive points on your notepad or any other format that suits the discussion.

Rule 5: Retain Your Balance

During the discussion itself, give your logical counterpoint without aggression when there is a disagreement. You are not there to prove that your stand is right, but to show your maturity and logical thinking. When the discussion drags over a point, it is time for you to interject and turn the discussion in a new direction, either with a related point or with an opposite view.

Be to the point and intervene when another candidate is taking all the airtime. When he pauses for breath, it is the right time to take your chance, state your point and then, pass the chance to someone who hasn’t had his say.

Rule 6: Follow your Domain

Keep the domain in mind while projecting your image. Let’s suppose you are facing a group discussion for a sales function, you may have to take a more aggressive approach whereas a marketing function could veer towards the creative and the practical approach in assessment.

Group discussions are as much about your knowledge and point-of-view as about how you handle yourself and others. Do these right and you will have projected the right image.

Share Your Views

Interview

Acing Job Interviews

1. Start with knowing who you are and what you want. The easiest of all job interview questions — “tell me about yourself.” By articulating a concise response to this question, you’ll be — and more importantly appear — more confident.

 

2. Gather work samples. The time and effort of reviewing your work samples and accomplishments lays an excellent foundation for composing responses to typical interview questions.

 

3. Develop stories that demonstrate excellence. No matter the type of interview you might face, with a collection of stories that demonstrate your passion, expertise, and accomplishments, you’ll be ready.

 

4. Ask what to expect when you’re invited for the interview. Information is a key to your success, and knowing the type of interview to expect — and who will be conducting the interview — is crucial to your success.

 

5. Use your network to learn more about employer, open position. See if any of your network contacts — works for your prospective employer.

 

6. Conduct interview prep and practice. Write out responses to typical interview questions, making certain to provide enough detail to properly answer the questions.

 

7. Take your interviewing skills for a tryout. If this interview is your first in a while or just a really big one for you — take your interview prep to the next level by working with a friend or career expert and conducting a mock interview.

 

8. Dress for success. Appearance does matter. Your goal is to look the part of someone who already works at the employer’s workplace.

 

7. Bring extra copies of your resume to the interview. You never know when the hiring manager might misplace your resume. Taking along a few extra copies of your resume is a simple, but smart idea.

 

8. Plan to arrive a bit early to interview. Arriving 10-15 minutes before your interview — avoid being any earlier.

 

9. Greet everyone you meet with respect — and a smile. When you’re interviewing, everyone you speak with matters — from the receptionist to the assistant to the hiring manger… everyone.

 

10. Shine from the very beginning of the interview. Making a great first impression begins with a firm handshake, smile, and eye contact. It’s important to show your enthusiasm and confidence in the interview.

 

11. Excel in the job interview. This is the moment when all your preparation pays off. Using positive non-verbal (good posture, eye contact, smile, strong speaking voice) and solid responses should help propel you through the interview successfully. Remember to stay calm — even if thrown by an unexpected question.

 

12. Close the interview strongly. Always close the interview with a thank-you and a request for information about the next step in the process.

Share Your Views