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Use of Phrases in English

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The use of phrases in the English language is a very interesting and at times a hilarious affair. As Indians, we love to translate the entire sentence, word to word, from Hindi to English; therefore sometimes it becomes quite hilarious. Here’s a look at some of the most commonly used phrases in English which are incorrect.

  • “What’s your good name?” There is no good or bad name. A name is just a name. So, instead of asking a person’s “good name” what we can ask instead is “May I know your name? or May I take your name?”. It sounds polite and is the correct way of knowing someone’s name.
  • “Where do you put up?” Do we put down also!! Well! There is a proper way to ask where the person lives. You can simply ask “Where do you live or where do you reside?”
  • Another commonly used phrase is “Kindly revert back”. Revert itself means to reply back so we need not add an additional back with revert.
  • Next comes the humble “discuss about”. Now, you will ask what’s wrong with this phrase. Well! Discuss means to talk about things. Therefore, we again need not add an extra about to it.
  • Next in line is “I will do the work today itself”. Today means by end of the day. So we need not add itself to it
  • Similar to the above is “I came back today only”.. Again, if you have come today , then it means you are already here, so need not again put an extra only to it.
  • Now comes the most amusing phrase used “My house is at the backside of the park”. Ahh!! Backside!! Well, we all know what it refers to!! Instead of saying the backside entrance, we can simply say “the rear of the park or the back of the park or entrance”.
  • We Indians love traveling. And it’s a common phrase to say “out of station”. Again, in earlier times when railway was the preferred mode of transport, this phrase could have still made sense as it referred to moving out of the railway station. But no longer is this phrase apt for today’s era. We can replace this phrase by simply saying “I was out of town”.
  • Next in line is “passed out”. Again a term very prevalently used. Now, this means that a person has become unconscious or fainted. We never ever use this phrase to ask “When did you pass out from college?” It literally means “When did you faint in college?” The correct way to as is “When did you complete your college education?” or “When did you pass from college?”
  • We are all scared of giving exams, isn’t it? There we go!!! Again an Indian phrase commonly used by all “Are you giving your board exams?” That’s completely incorrect. The suitable way of saying this is “Are you taking you board exams?”
  • As Indians, we love to talk incessantly about our family. And then comes another Indian phrase widely used by most of us; “My real brother/sister”. Come on!! Do we have a fake brother or sister too? No!!! So simply say “siblings”. Another error which we make while talking about our family is “cousin brother/sister”. Cousin is a cousin; you need not add a brother or sister to it.
  • Let’s talk about Hinglish now!! Adding a “Na” at the end of sentence. “You are coming for the movie, na?” Come to think of it!! You are literally asking that person to not come!! Just ask “Are you coming for the movie?” Let that person say a ‘haan’ or a ‘na’!!
  • Another language fallacy is the use of “herself”, inappropriately. e.g. “She herself only completed the work”. Which means that she did the work on her own. A better and of course the correct way of saying this is “She did the work all by herself or she did the work on her own.”
  • Back is back again!! This time wrongly used in a different concept. Ever heard people saying ­­“Two years back I was in China?” Well! Well! Well! No back here please!!! Usage of a small word here, will change the way you talk. Please replace “back” with “ago”. Hence, it’s “Two years ago, I was in China.”
  • Last, but not the least is the over usage of the “Present Continuous Tense”. Words like having, liking, etc. How does this sentence sound – He’s is loving those shoes? Wrong! Wrong! Wrong! It should be “He loves those shoes”. Another common one is “Are you having your laptop with you?” Didn’t know we can eat laptops too!!! “Having is consuming”. Therefore, we cannot use having unless we are referring to an eatable item. Instead please say” Do you have your laptop with you?” “Have” indicates possession.

Hope, the above fantastic fifteen will be an eye opener for us and we stop using these phrases to make our English sound more refined. Getting my point!! Ohhh!!! I mean, got my point?:)

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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English for Online Conversations

blog_post_2_English for online conversation

“There are people who are realizing that online communication is the wave of the future,” says Don Knezek, CEO of the International Society for Technology in Education.  It’s time we talk about the English we use online,  it’s also important to brush our conversational skills on the internet.

From email to chat messengers to  blogs, these days, everyone is communicating online. Understanding how to interact online safely and effectively in English is, and will always be important, but does anyone really talk about it? Does anyone teach us  the same?

Time is changing and it’s important to keep few things in mind while communicating online:

  • Begin messages with a salutation and end them with your name. (Email conversations)
  • Use a signature at the end of a message. (Email conversations)
  • Acknowledge and return messages promptly.
  • Be concise. Keep messages to the point.
  • Restrict profane or rude language. Avoid “flaming” (online “screaming”) or sentences typed in all caps.
  • Check grammar and spellings.
  • Do not use abbreviations and short forms, professionally.
  • Keep your messages to the point and keep discussions organised by adding to a relevant thread.
  • Don’t be in too much of a hurry. Spell check your message before clicking “Post” and try to proofread for other errors.
  • There’s a lot of evidence online, avoid using abusive language, gossip, nicknames, profanity etc.
  • Think before you post a blog, be careful not to hurt someone’s sentiments.
  • Be careful when using sarcasm and humour. It can easily be misunderstood as a personal attack. If you are being humorous, try to include smilies/emoticons in your messages to express such humour. They are very useful for letting people know that your comment is friendly.
  • Use words in brackets, such as (grin), to show your state of mind.
  • Use appropriate emoticons while chatting.
  • Use common acronyms which are usually understood.
  • If you are responding to a particular person address your post to them. You can use @ followed by their name (applicable to a group chat).
  • Avoid sarcasm. People who don’t know you may misinterpret its meaning.
  • Respect others’ privacy.
  • Don’t send spam messages.

So, keep these things in mind and avoid posting in anger, stop and take a break, make a nice cup of coffee, maybe a milder message would be more effective. Think about what you have written before you post it, that’s a plus when it comes to online conversations, you don’t have to reply instantly. If you absolutely have to disagree, do so politely. You should be sensitive to the others’ feelings and opinion. So, reply to the argument, not the author. It’s the world wide web, so respect other’s opinions. Be tolerant of other people’s mistakes. Not everybody knows the rules of conversational etiquette on internet, not everyone is posting in their native language, so be patient and remember, we were all once a newbie. It’s very important to be careful online with English, because it has nothing to do with the  tone, we cannot see or hear people behind the screen. So, be careful with English and keep your best foot forward.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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How to Improve English at Home

blog_post_2_wlEnglish language is the accretion and growth of every dialect, race, and range of time. Without second thoughts, we all know this is one of the most proficient and prominently used languages across the globe. With the growing trend of learning this language and the increasing number of English learning institutes, the most frequent question popping up in every learner’s head is ‘How to learn it ?’ Learning a non-native language takes a lot of practice and subsequently involves all aspects of it, right from listening and reading to writing and speaking.

One very prominent way to start fun learning of this language is to do it right in the comfort of your own home. Our own home is a peaceful place where we can learn the way we want to.

Reading out loud is one of the common ways to improve and understand how you sound to the listener. Reading silently can help train your mind in the English language. However, reading out loud will train your tongue to speak English properly. You can pick any book, poem or short story you want and start reading the words out loud.

There are other fun ways to learn and broaden the vocabulary range. Like, to play games that require you to read or speak in English. A good example is monopoly. Easiest and most likely is to chat with friends online. What better way to learn to speak in English than learning with friends? Instead of chatting with them through your keyboard, why not just do a voice or video call instead? This way, you can practice speaking in English in a conversational way and it eventually eradicates fumbling in our speech. This will be good practice for both the callers.

Another way is to record your voice yourself. This doesn’t need the involvement of another person and can be executed anytime you’re free. Recording yourself will help you know your pronunciation mistakes. To record yourself, you can use your smartphone, tablet or even your laptop. Simply start by finding a piece that you’d like to read, and then open up your device’s Audio Recorder and start recording yourself. Now, recording your own voice is just the first step. The more important step is to check if you’ve pronounced the words correctly. For this you may even take the help of different apps available online.

Listening is the foremost step towards learning any language. This way you improve your comprehension skills and also gauge other factors of spoken English like intonation and accent. Listening to your favorite soap operas, reality shows improvises your understanding in this language. You may start with listening to native speakers and understand their accent, intonation and rate of speech. Rate of speech is the number of words spoken per minute and the ideal ROS should be 120 words per minute. Not only listening and understanding will help the individual in the long run but also implementing the learning is of vital importance.

Any words we come across should not only be restricted to our walls of mind but need to be spoken and used frequently to make it a part of our vocabulary. Learning to speak with the correct Intonation, voice modulation and the right rate of speech comes requires a lot of practice and patience. Establishing a routine for your English time at home is better. We can use everyday situations and real objects from around the house to practice the language naturally and in context. For example: learning food vocabulary while cooking. Nonetheless, one has to be strong willed and quite passionate to learn English at home. It has to be intense and compassionate learning which later will yield the desired outcome.

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English Speaking at Workplace    

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Two international corporations active in India, Thomson Reuters and Unisys have invested in Business English and have seen significant results in their employees’ skill sets, career development and communication abilities. A study identified an increase in English language proficiency across the country within the past two decades, from only 11% in 1991 to approximately 20% by 2005.

A person can make rapid strides in his career if besides the mandatory skills that are required, he also can speak English fluently and effectively. If you do not possess this most sought after skill set, it is considered as a serious handicap for any aspiring professional. Due to globalization, using English at workplace has many benefits, like the success of the organization you are working with, building and improving relationships at work, enhancing and developing your own skill set etc. It’s considered to be a huge asset to be able to speak good English, especially if you are associated with a Multi-National Company.

Most of the companies believe that better English improves the productivity of employees. Proficient English language skills can give you more opportunities to expand your career prospects. This language is essential if you want to get ahead in today’s fast-paced global economy, whether you are looking to secure your ideal job, or to be more productive at work, or simply to increase your chances of promotion.

Companies need a language strategy, especially if they have global aspirations. Companies are finding it easy to adapt English as a common language of business. Good English allows one to communicate effectively with international clients, helping them to trust the company that results in strong and lasting business relationships. Multinational companies need to interact with clients and business partners across the globe, and those who ignore the need for a language strategy limit their growth.

People who regularly use English at workplace, use it for various purposes like meetings, negotiations, report writing, presentations, training, sending e-mails, making sales calls, social gatherings etc.

It is estimated that over 50% of the pages on the internet are written in English which means that more online information is available to people who can read English. Having access to so much more information can make a real difference to your professional life, even if you don’t work with colleagues or clients who speak English. You may find that information from a website written in English may help you to understand a project better or provide some useful information for a report.

It’s said, ‘Language shapes the way we think, and determines what we think about.’

There are many benefits for proficient employees as well. As employees become more fluent in the language, they develop confidence and feel more secure at a time when jobs come and go. Being proficient in English could open doors for them; they can take on more and more roles that require English speaking ability. Career advancement and a fatter pay cheque are among the many benefits. English communication is of paramount importance in today’s globalized workplace.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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English Speaking in Social Gatherings

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Anyone using English in social gatherings should refrain from an academic approach and strive to give it a living interest by keeping the attention of others on English as it is spoken today. The idea here is to communicate so avoid using jargons and difficult words.

Communication, a word of Latin origin, means sharing. In a social gathering, people interact with each other either to exchange pleasantries, share some information or good/bad experiences. We all know that the most common medium of communication is English language, especially in the gatherings where you get to interact with the upper middle or high class. Even the middle class doesn’t seem to remain unaffected by this trend.

Conversation in social gatherings should be highly confident yet speech should be highly courteous. The gestures used while conversing in English is a reflection of one’s involvement in the interaction. A few examples can be-smile, nod, wave our hands, etc. These non-linguistic symbols keep the attention of the other person on what we say.

In any social gathering, communication involves two parties who interact on a common topic.  Without a common background or interest there can be no effective communication. Here comes the most important factor to remember which is to be cooperative and be a patient listener while communicating. If we speak to someone in a social place without paying heed to the other person’s interest, then there is a possibility that he/she will get totally lost  in his own thoughts and in no time communication will stop.

English has developed as a common medium of communication in social functions also. Hence it is the right strategy to keep ourselves updated with the recent developments and changes in English language. English language used in a social circle can differ a lot from business communication. We need to be sensitive about using suitable gestures while addressing different people who might speak distinctly.

It is very important to respond appropriately when a sender transmits a message. The response should be immediate and favourable. This is important because the person in front of us will naturally be interested in knowing how his message has been received. Immediate feedback is possible very easily in a face to face interaction. An advantage of such communication is the adjustment of the length of communication. Knowledge and usage of correct English can reveal the inner strength, upbringing, nature and much more about a person’s personality.

English language has virtues which are unparalleled because greeting, thanking, apology, respect, farewell, etc. can be expressed very beautifully in English phrases. Correct English is always appreciated in social gatherings by the ones who are well versed in the usage of the language. In many cases the message may fail to receive the desired response because of a semantic gap between the people interacting. This failure occurs because the sender may not be clear about what is to be conveyed and may use inappropriate English to convey his ideas. It may also happen if the listener is not able to understand and interpret the meaning of the conversation. Therefore it is important to acquire and apply correct skills of English language in social gatherings.

EnglishMate is a chain of English Speaking Institutes by Hindustan Times that offers a range of courses to help you speak better English and get smarter.

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Importance of English in Career Growth

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Why do young professionals, be it a graduate or a post graduate (B.Tech, M.Tech, MBA, MCA etc) take up courses to polish their communication skills in English? Why are organizations these days engaged in training students and employees on effective communication skills in English? Why do parents leave no stone unturned to make sure that their children are sent to the best of schools? Years ago, the choice used to be between a good public school and a convent school. Today, the choices have extended to the international schools following IB curriculum. Whatever be the reasons for the different choices that parents make but one thing that is not debatable is the fact that almost all parents want their children to have the ability to communicate confidently and effectively in English

Ever wondered why? Well, one need not wonder because the answer seems quite obvious. Good command over English opens up various avenues for a bright career.

You may ask “Why English?”

People have been moving to different countries for better job opportunities. One of the most important aspects in getting a good job abroad is the command over English. TOFEL/ IELTS/PTE must be cleared in order to get good opportunities overseas. More than 2 billion people all over the world use English to communicate on a regular basis. Research shows that English is the business language across the globe. With globalization, all cross-border business communication is usually done in English. It’s presence in the global market place cannot be underestimated.

English is spoken across the globe due to Great Britain’s expansion during the colonial age. People in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and parts of Africa, India, and many small island nations speak English. English is the commonly adopted second language in Germany, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands.

Moreover most of the content produced on the internet is in English, many of the world’s top films, books and music are also published and produced in English. So knowing English will allow you access to an incredible amount of information which may not be otherwise available. Research shows that English speakers in the world earn more money than non-English speakers. Being a comfortable communicator in English can help you land that first job in your new career and ensure a positive future. It can also make you better than other applicants and help you be a more effective employee. In fact, English serves as a stepping stone to leadership responsibilities and career advancement.

As the saying goes, ‘Whatever you are, be a good one.

If you can communicate well in English you can explain your ideas to others in ways that make sense and are easy to understand. You’ll be able to tell your supervisor what you need to do your job well. You’ll also be able to talk with co-workers to make sure you’re all working together for the benefit of the company and its customers. English is required for communicating in a variety of professional fields including: business, information technology, science, medicine, aviation, entertainment, radio, diplomacy and more.

So, if you have a good command over English, your opportunities for a well-paid and interesting career increase manifold. You’ll be able to work for, or deal with, international companies and organizations around the globe, which in turn may lead to opportunities to travel and broaden your outlook. English, when spoken with confidence and finesse, not only adds to the charisma, but also helps one accomplish their personal professional goals.

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WHEN TO USE SOME AND ANY

The words Some and Any (Quantifiers that can be used with countable and uncountable nouns) are used to state the quantity or amount of something. Usually both ‘some’ and ‘any’ can only be used with plural countable nouns or uncountable nouns, but not usually with singular countable nouns.

 

Rules:

SOME:

  • Some is used in Positive statements (Affirmative). For e.g.:

 

  • She bought some
  • I want some
  • There are some exercise books on the floor.

 

  • Some is usually used in Offers.

 

  • Would you like some coffee?
  • Do you want some chocolates?

 

  • Some’ can be used in Requests.

 

  • Could I have some cheese, please?
  • Have you got some funny stickers that I could borrow?

 

  • Some is used with the plural form of countable nouns and it is also used with uncountable nouns.

 

  • I have some friends in Bangalore.
  • I need some water to drink.

ANY:

  • Any is used in negative statements. For e.g.:

 

  • My brother never ever does any
  • She didn’t buy any potatoes.
  • We haven’t got any

 

  • Any is usually used in Questions.

 

  • Is there any milk in the freezer?
  • Have you seen any good films recently?
  • Didn’t she buy any tomatoes?

 

  • Any is also used with the plural form of countable nouns and it is also used with uncountable nouns.

 

  • They didn’t sing any
  • There isn’t any water in the fridge.

EXCEPTIONS:

  • Any can be used in positive sentences having a negative feeling.

 

  • Neha left the house without any money
  • We hardly watch any television.

 

  • Some can be used in questions when we expect the answer to be ‘yes’.

 

  • Would you like some coffee?
  • Could you pass me some ice cubes?
  • Do you want some salad?
  • Any can be used in a positive sentence but the meaning changes .It means in the case where ‘it’s not important which one’. In this way it is most often used with singular countable nouns:

 

  • You can take any
  • Come over any Wednesday

 

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Who Vs Whom

A lot of speakers get confused when it comes to using who and whom, here’s the explanation:

Who

Who, an interrogative pronoun, refers to -what or which person or people and is used in place of the subject of a question

  • Who is in the team?
  • Who did this?

It is used to question a person’s character or authority.

Who is used in statements as well, in place of the subject of a clause.

  • Sameer is the one who wants to play.
  • Anyone who knows the motive should be able to help us.

Whom

‘Whom’ is also an interrogative pronoun, however, it is used in place of the object of a question- more so, in formal writing or speech.

  • Whom is this story about?
  • With whom are you going to the party?
  • Whom did they call?

Whom is used as object of a verb or a preceding preposition

  • to know for whom his heart beats.

 

It is also sometimes used as the object of a following preposition

  • the woman whom you wrote to.

 

And whom can also be used in statements, in place of the object of a clause.

  • This is the girl whom I was talking about.
  • Mani is the man whom we met at dinner last week.

 

Whom is always the correct choice after a preposition.

  • The students, some of whom are graduating this year, failed the test.
  • Jaspreet is the girl with whom I’m going to Nagaland.

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Using Adjectives to Describe People

Adjectives are words that describe or modify other words. They can identify or quantify another person or thing in the sentence. People may behave differently at home than at work, and in the company of certain people. Let’s look at different types of behavior and some words that describe them. Remember adjectives are usually positioned before the noun or the pronoun that they modify.
In the following examples, the highlighted words are adjectives:

Affectionate An affectionate persona is someone who is very loving.

My brother is very affectionate.

Aggressive Someone who is physically or verbally threatening towards other people.

I don’t like aggressive people. I like people who are relaxed and calm.

Ambitious Someone who is keen to get on in life.

Tarun is very ambitious. He is hoping to be promoted soon.

Anxious Someone who worries a lot.

Tanmay is a very anxious person. He worries far too much about things.

Artistic Someone who is good at creative things, such as painting and drawing.

Jaspreet is very artistic. She is really good at drawing.

Bad-tempered Somebody who gets angry a lot.

My uncle is really bad-tempered. He is always shouting at my cousins.

Big-headed Someone with a very high opinion of themselves.

Sahil is a bit big-headed. He thinks more of himself than others do.

Boring Someone who is not very interesting.

Anu is a bit boring. She never has anything interesting to say.

Bossy Someone who tries to control other people.

My grandmother is a bit bossy. She’s always ordering my poor granddad.

Charismatic Someone who attracts other people, and who is good at getting people’s attention.

Barack Obama is a very charismatic politician.

Creative Someone who is an original thinker, or who has artistic skills.

Mona is very creative,  she always comes up with new ideas.

Courageous Someone who is very brave.

Anurag is a fireman. He is very courageous. He rescues people from fires.

Dependable Someone who is very reliable.

Riya is very dependable. She always keeps her promises.

Devious Someone who cheats other people, to get what they want.

Shashank can be bit devious at times. I wouldn’t trust him.

Dim (Insult)Someone who is not very intelligent.

It’s difficult to be friends with a dim wit.

 

Extroverted Someone who is very outgoing.

Dev is very extroverted. He’s always the life and soul of the party.

Egotistical Someone who acts as if they are more important than others.

Suraj is a bit egotistical. He tends to look down on people.

Gregarious Very sociable

Tina is very gregarious. She has lots of friends.

Impulsive Someone who acts before thinking.

Lucky can be a bit impulsive. He doesn’t always think before he acts.

Intelligent Someone who is very clever.

Jagmeet is a very intelligent man.

Introverted Someone who is quiet and shy.

Mira is quite introverted. She doesn’t really enjoy parties.

Industrious Very hard working.

Sujan is very industrious. He works really hard at his job.

Joyful Very Happy

I’m in a joyful mood today. Life is good at the moment.

Reliable Someone you can depend upon.

Ashu is very reliable. You can always depend on him to keep his promises.

Sociable Someone who enjoys mixing with people.

Damini is very sociable. She has a lot of friends.

Sympathetic Someone who offers friendly ear to people with problems.

Prakash is a very sympathetic person. He’s also a really good listener.

Talkative Someone who talks a lot.

Rashmi is very talkative. She’s always on the phone, chatting to friends.

Upbeat Someone with a cheerful, positive attitude to life.

His upbeat attitude makes him very popular among people.

 

 

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Common English Pronunciation Mistakes

The two most common causes of pronunciation errors are speaking too fast and not reading the word through.

  1. assessory or accessory ?

Tip: There is a double C with one pronounced hard

like accident and access.

  1. Affadavid or affidavit?

It is an affidavit and has no David in it.

  1. Fort or Forte?

The E on the end of forte is not silent. It sounds like the letter A : fortay.

  1. Parlament or Parliament?

There should be a Y after L: [pahr-lyuh- muhnt].

English does have spelling rules, a little difficult sometimes, and spelling often helps in pronunciation. Speaking carefully and reading actively are keys to good spelling and pronunciation.

Few common English pronunciation mistakes have been given below:

 

1)         FEBRUARY

Say:     /feb-ru-ary/                                                                              Don’t say:        /feb-rari/

2)         ATHLETE

Say:     /ath-lete/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /ath-eh-lete/

3)         ACCESSORY

Say:     /ak-se-sory/                                                                              Don’t say:        /asse-sory/

4)         COMB

Say:     /koomb/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /komb/

5)         BURY

Say:     /be-ri/                                                                                       Don’t say:        /bu-ry/

6)         WOMEN

Say:     /wi-min/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /wo-men/

7)         ALSO

Say:     /awl-so/                                                                                                Don’t say:        /aal-so/

8)         COLLEAGUE

Say:     /ko-lig/                                                                                     Don’t say:        /ku-lig/

9)         DILATED

Say:     /di-lated/                                                                                  Don’t say:        /di-a-lated/

10)       ET CETRA

Say:     /et-cetra/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /ek-cetra/

11)       HEIRARCHY

Say:     /hai-er-arky/                                                                             Don’t say:        /hee-rarky/

12)       WEDNESDAY

Say:     /wenz-day/                                                                               Don’t say:        /wed-nes-day/

13)       APOLOGY

Say:     /a-pology/                                                                                Don’t say:        /e-pology/

14)       ADVANTAGE

Say:     /ad-vantage/                                                                             Don’t say:        /ed-vantage/

15)       DEBT

Say:     /det/                                                                                         Don’t say:        /debt/

16)       ENVIRONMENT

Say:     /in-vae-ment/                                                                           Don’t say:        /en-viron-ment/

17)       PROMOTION

Say:     /pr-motion/                                                                               Don’t say:        /pro-motion/

18)       POEM

Say:     /poe-um/                                                                                  Don’t say:        /po-yum/

19)       EPITOME

Say:     /epi-tumi/                                                                                 Don’t say:        /epi-tome/

20)       ASTHMA

Say:     /az-maa/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /as-thmaa/

21)       DEBRIS

Say:     /deb-ree/                                                                                  Don’t say:        /deb-ris/

22)       PIZZA

Say:     /peet-zaa/                                                                                 Don’t say:        /pee-zaa/

23)       BOWL

Say:     /bol/                                                                                         Don’t say:        /baul/

24)       BREAKFAST

Say:     /brek-fust/                                                                                Don’t say:        /brek-faast/

25)       VIOLIN

Say:     /vaa-yuh-lin/                                                                            Don’t say:        /voee-lin/

26)       EXTEMPORE

Say:     /extem-puh-ree/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /extem-por/

27)       DENGUE

Say:     /den-gee/                                                                                  Don’t say:        /den-goo/

28)       COUPON

Say:     /koo-pawn/                                                                              Don’t say:        /koo-pun/

29)       TOMB

Say:     /toom/                                                                                      Don’t say:        /tomb/

30)       IRON

Say:     /ai-yun/                                                                                                Don’t say:        /aai-run/

31)       BANQUET

Say:     /ban-kwet/                                                                                Don’t say:        /ban-kwey/

32)       RESTAURANT

Say:     /res-tuh-raunt/                                                                          Don’t say:        /res-traunt/

33)       DATA

Say:     /day-taa/                                                                                   Don’t say:        /daa-taa/

34)       TOUR

Say:     /too-ur/                                                                                     Don’t say:        /toor/

35)       PRONUNCIATION

Say:     /pro-nun-cia-shun/                                                                   Don’t say:/pro-noun-cia-shun/

 

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